President George Washington – Autograph Document Signed In Text 12/23/1774

 

 

GEORGE WASHINGTON Washington handwrote and signed this document, showing that he paid 100 for his neighbor’s wheat, only five months after being selected to be a delegate at the Continental Congress. This document has his full name of “George Washington” instead of his more common signature of “G. Washington”, which makes it especially rare. Autograph document signed in text: “George Washington”. 1 page, 7¼x4¼. [Fairfax County, Virginia, 1774 December 23]. In Full: “Then Received from George Washington the Currt Sum of One hundred pounds in part payment for Wheat sold him by” to which the seller has signed: “Thomas Triplett”. Penned at top left (unknown hand, possibly Triplett’s): “Receivd Decr 23d 1774”. THOMAS TRIPLETT was a descendent of French Huguenots who came to America to escape religious persecution. Triplett grew wheat on his plantation in Fairfax County, not far from Washington’s Mount Vernon plantation. After his brother Lawrence’s widow died in 1761, George Washington became the outright owner of Mount Vernon and began to shift his farms over from the traditional tobacco crop to wheat, for which he built his own gristmill. His mill ground grain into flour. Five months before Washington purchased this wheat, on July 14, 1774, he was selected by Fairfax County to be a delegate to the first Virginia Convention, which met in Williamsburg in August. He then served as a member of the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia from September 5 to October 26, 1774, returning to the Second Continental Congress which convened on May 10, 1775. This document was written between the dates of the First and Second Continental Congresses. The Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought on April 19, 1775, beginning the Revolutionary War. On June 15, 1775, Washington was unanimously chosen as Commander in Chief of “all the forces raised or to be raised” and c… More information available. 




President George Washington - Autograph Document Signed In Text 12/23/1774
President George Washington – Autograph Document Signed In Text 12/23/1774







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Michelangelo Merisi Caravaggio – The Head of Medusa 1597

Michelangelo Merisi Caravaggio - The Head of Medusa
Michelangelo Merisi Caravaggio – The Head of Medusa 1597

 

Caravaggio (1571-1610) painted two versions of the Head of Medusa. The first in 1596 and the other presumably in 1597/8. The first version also known as Murtula, due to the poet who wrote about it (48×55 cm) is signed Michel A F, (Michel Angelo Fecit) and was found on the painter’s studio only after his dead. Nowadays it belongs to a private collection whilst the second version, slightly bigger (60 x 55 cm) is not signed and it is in the Uffizi Gallery, in Florence.
The “Head of Medusa” executed by Caravaggio, in 1598, was commissioned as a cerimonial shield by Cardinal Francesco Maria Del Monte, the Medici family’s agent in Rome, after seeing, on the painters studio, the first version – The Metula painting. The purpose of this commissioned was to symbolize the Grand Duke of Tuscany’s courage in defeating his enemies. For its subject matter, Caravaggio drew on the Greek myth of Medusa, a woman with snakes for hair who turned people to stone by looking at them.
Medusa was a Gorgon monster, a terrifying female creature from the Greek Mythology. While descriptions of Gorgons vary across Greek literature, the term commonly refers to any of three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying visage that turned those who beheld it to stone. Traditionally, while two of the Gorgons were immortal, Stheno and Euryale , their sister Medusa was not, and was slain by the mythical hero Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty. According to the story, she was killed by Perseus, who avoided direct eye contact by using a mirrored shield. After Medusa’s death, her decapitated head continued to petrify those that looked at it.
Caravaggio plays with this concept by modeling himself for Medusa’s face – making him the only one who is safe from Medusa’s dedly gaze – and having to look at his reflection to paint the shield in the same way that Medusa caught her own image moments before being killed. Although Caravaggio depicts Medusa’s severed head, she remains conscious. He heightens this combination of life and death through Medusa’s intense expression. Her wide-open mouth exudes a silent but dramatic scream and her shocked eyes and furrowed brow all suggest a sense of disbelief, as if she thought herself to be invincible until the moment. But Caravaggio’s Medusa does not have the full effect of scaring the viewer, since she does not look at us, thereby transferring the power of the gaze to the viewer and emphasizing her demise. Caravaggio displays huge technical achievements in this work by making a convex surface look concave and Medusa’s head appear to project outward.





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A Hot Rod 1932 Ford 5w Coupe

Streetrod Hotrod 1932 Ford 5w coupe American Graffitti
Streetrod Hotrod 1932 Ford 5w coupe American Graffitti

 

1932 Ford 5 window American Graffiti steel reinforced Downs fiberglass body with 3/4″ plywood throughout, Black vinyl interior, Balanced and blueprint engine factory 350-430hp brand new GM 4 bolt block, Elderblock aluminum heads, hydralic Roller Cam, Elderbrock air gap intake, 650 Elderbrock carb MSD dist, 700R4 heavy duty auto with 2500 stall, 9″ Ford rearend w/31 splines and 3.55 gear, 4WDB Vintique chrome reverse wheels, Vega steering, Stewart warner wings gauges, complete photo history of build.

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1932 Ford 5w coupe
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Streetrod Hotrod 1932 Ford 5w coupe American Graffitti

Streetrod Hotrod 1932 Ford 5w coupe American Graffitti




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